News

Bull Market - Collaboration with beef industry tests advanced breeding technologies

October 09, 2018

By Robin DeRieux

COWS ARE SPECIAL. As ruminants, they eat grass and other plants that are inedible to people, transforming forage into steak and hamburgers and other tasty high-protein beef products.

Over the past few decades, the beef industry has made significant improvements in productivity—generating more food from fewer numbers of cattle. Better breeding and other innovations in animal science research have played a starring role in these advances.

UC Davis ranks first in the world in Plant and Animal Sciences

August 21, 2018

UC Davis scores first in programs for plant and animal sciences in U.S. News and World Report’s “Best Global Universities” report issued Monday (Oct. 24).

The rankings, which focus on overall research and academic reputation, rather than specific undergraduate or graduate programs, show UC Davis second in the world in agricultural sciences, and fourth in environment and ecology.

McLean and Murray aim to preserve genetics of Santa Cruz Island horses

August 02, 2018

by Joe Proudman, UC Davis

IT'S HOT AT EL CAMPEON FARMS, even for early August. A hard wind accompanies the heat, blowing through the Conejo Valley, where this horse ranch sits in Southern California. Abby Followwill is saddled on a horse named Vince. His golden-brown coat and blond mane stand out against the saturated blue sky and dusty corral where Followwill is training with him.

Pablo Ross leads national cow genomics effort

July 10, 2018
The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture has awarded the University of California, Davis, $2.5 million over four years for a national cow genomics project.

Anne Todgham on how how Antarctic fish cope with climate stress

July 09, 2018
Some Antarctic fish living in the planet’s coldest waters are able to cope with the stress of rising carbon dioxide levels in the ocean. They can even tolerate slightly warmer waters. But they can’t deal with both stressors at the same time, according to a study from the University of California, Davis.

Alison Van Eenennaam examines how gene editing can enhance sustainability plus animal health and welfare

September 15, 2017

Gene Editing Can Complement Traditional Food-Animal Improvements
By Pat Bailey (UC Davis News)

Quick Summary
  • Gene editing builds on traditional breeding successes
  • The technology enhances sustainability plus animal health and welfare
  • Questions remain about regulatory issues

Gene editing — one of the newest and most promising tools of biotechnology — enables animal breeders to make beneficial genetic changes, without bringing along unwanted genetic changes.